• Clintelica’s Network Management, Patent Approved by USPTO

    Clintelica’s patent claim on the network management solution it offers has been approved by the USPTO.

    Obviously, this comes as very exciting news for the whole Clintelica team, who has been working hard on all fronts to ensure the application is not only a fully functional, useful and productive tool for companies all over the world, but also unique.

    The decision made by the US Patent and Trademark Office comes as confirmation that the ideas behind our contact management application are proper innovations. Basically, the USPTO has responded positively to our list of claims for patent:

    - an application for managing and sharing electronic contacts (coming from external social networks, address book of e-mail accounts, mobile phones, business applications or other contact databases) of users of a group

    - the processes of gathering, merging and sharing the contacts of users of a group

    - the processes of searching and keeping active searches on specific terms in relation to these contacts

    Of course, this gives us fuel to work on further developments to the application, which at this moment helps businesses all over the world not only to increase sales by selling through the innovative (and now patented) networking module, but also manage clients through Predictive CRM and keep clients happy through a Feedback Management System.

    Read more about how Clintelica’s Networking Module can change Sales and Recruiting in a series of articles on this blog here.

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  • Shock & Awe: 9 out of 10 US Employees Completely Disengaged

    An employee of GE once said to Jack Welch. “You have paid for my hands for 24 years, but you could have had my brain for free.” Manipulative and memorable line, you will agree, and one that proves even the most successful companies fails to engage all employees. It was a big issue then, it’s still a big issue now.

    Far from being just a concept in management books, employee engagement is essential to a company’s productivity. There are extensive studies showing that organizations with high employee engagement significantly increase their odds of above-average performance across their businesses. Companies that understand and implement employee engagement as a core strategy are those companies whose employees will be more profitable, more customer-focused, more motivated to succeed and less likely to leave the organization.

    Real life, though, is not that poetic. According to a recent survey on Employee Engagement in the US Workforce from Modern Survey‘, it seems that only 10% of US employees feel they are fully engaged in the company they work for. 24% are “moderately engaged”, 30% feel they are “disengaged” and a staggering 37% are “under engaged”.

    Now, understanding that all effort to keep company staff satisfied increases productivity is the first logical step in engaging employees. The second one is to figure out how to do it and where to act. Measuring the engagement level in any organization is complicated business, but spending a couple of hours immersed in online studies can reveal several words that pop up as drivers in engagement, so it shouldn’t be that complicated to start working on the process. Why then, it happens that we have these catastrophic results? Why are, in fact, companies around the world struggling with this particular subject?

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  • Mobile CRM Dilemma: Innovation vs. Delivery

    According to their IPO Registration Statement, Facebook had 488 Million Active Users who logged in with mobile products in March 2012.

    Beyond the obvious WOW generated by the huge figures, the trend is obvious: earthlings have really fallen in love with their smartphones. Of course, the signs have been there all along, as The New Yorker pointed out with their disturbingly real November 2009 cover (see below), but the predictions now show that smartphones are going for global domination.

    According studies from SSI (here), or the International Telecommunications Union (here), roughly 90% or the World’s population now owns a mobile phone subscription, and smartphone sales have shown huge worldwide growth in 2011, with estimations from China and India that people over there will go ape as soon as cheaper smartphones will enter the market.

    More than this, global 3G subscription stats show an increase of 35% year on year, which should send the current 17% penetration of 3G through the roof in the months to come.

    All in all, there’s a new distribution channel out there, mobile usage this year is still bigger than web consumption, and companies are still trying to figure out what to do about it. In a show of complete transparency, Facebook admited that one of the biggest risk factors it faces comes from mobile usage (some are even speculating that they didn’t fix their faulty iPhone app because they wanted people to log in from their computers):

    Growth in use of Facebook through our mobile products, where our ability to monetize is unproven, as a substitute for use on personal computers may negatively affect our revenue and financial results.

    The same goes, more or less, for companies operating in CRM. After the huge leap from desktop customer relationship implementation to cloud systems a few years back, the mobile age is starting to shift the focus of CRM companies as we speak. And even though some feel like mobile CRM apps are slow to take off, the increase of mobile usage in the area is sort of like the sound of inevitability. The interesting fact (and the biggest opportunity) is that if the trend holds, people will not shift from web to mobile, but they will use on the go CRM solutions on top of their web time. The only issue companies will have to address asap is wether to focus first of all on innovating for the new mobile CRM delivery platform or to simply go mobile as is.

    Just like in publishing, the medium is important (print / online / smartphones or tablet apps), but content is king. In the CRM market (with Social CRM estimated by Gartner at $1 billion in 2012) content kind of equals innovation, and we’ve seen some new features from players in the market. Almost all of them revolve around Social CRM, Social CRM Engagement or simple collection of data from social networks in order to create better client social profiles.

    But in order to really take a giant leap into the Mobile Age, CRM will need to make small decisive steps in leveraging huge Big Data advantages (available NOW!) for predictive sales. What if the CRM system could suggest business based on existing clients, could monitor for connections with so far unreachable potential clients or what if it could alert instantly for unsatisfied clients?

    What if all this was available both on the web AND on mobile platforms?

    Photo: Shutterstock

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  • How to use personal networks for efficient HR

    Recruiting is a time consuming and expensive business.

    Companies have always looked at the personal networks of employees in order to find new candidates, but they haven’t quite been able to access these networks in an efficient way.

    What if there was a way of gathering the overall social networking and address book contacts of all employees into one… virtual environment? Would that work better for HR departments? Our theory says yes.

    If we start with the statistically demonstrated fact that each employee nowadays has, on average, 600 friends and business partners (Facebook, LinkedIn, Address Book, etc), then a company of 100 employees will have at least 50.000 contacts.

    Accessing and understanding these 50.000 contacts makes the recruiting process much easier and the best thing about hiring people through these networks is that you deal with references from people within the company that you actually trust.

    Check out our latest Infographic below or on visual.ly to understand better how it works.

    Browse more data visualizations.

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  • Game Changing Combination: Big Data, Sales and Predictive CRM

    According to latest Cisco reports, global internet traffic will quadruple from 2010 to 2015, reaching 966 Exabytes (EB) per year.

    Just to keep things in perspective:

    1 EB = 1 000 000 terabytes = 1 000 000 000 gigabytes.

    Looking a bit backwards, according to an estimation from Eric Schmidt, former Google CEO, the total of human knowledge created from the dawn of man and digitized till 2003 totaled 5 Exabytes.

    These two values are so far apart in scale, dimension and time, that the logical conclusion should be that our ability to create data completely overpasses our ability to digest it. At least, that was the general consensus on the matter. Until now.

    Journalist James Bamford has confirmed in a recent Wired cover story older rumors that USA’s NSA is finalizing as we speak a massive surveillance center in Utah which will be able to store and process Yottabytes of data (the biggest data measurement unit yet). (1 million Exabytes = 1 Yottabyte).

    In short, this is the big data that transpired about the Utah Data Center:

    It will cost roughly $2 billion dollars and it will be finished sometime late 2013.

    It will store, monitor and analyze virtually all communication channels (internet, mobile phones, etc).

    It will be used to try and crack the AES encryption, the cryptographic standard considered unbreakable so far “in any amount of time relevant to mortals”.

    This means you needn’t worry, the Jack Bauers of the online are hard at work in dealing with Big Data issues…

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  • Clintelica Network CRM Presentation

    Our presentation on SlideShare looks like this.

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  • Useless Information vs Trust in Sales Meetings

    A recent study from Stanford Graduate School of Business warns here that having too much (or useless) information about future negotiation partners is actually worse than having no information at all. As it turns out, the false illusion of knowing how to approach your (sales) meeting made participants 46% less likely to identify important issues in the negotiation. That’s not to say checking out people’s profiles on LinkedIn or Facebook before knowing them in real life is totally bad, but it can very well take your mind off the important issues in the game.

    So don’t go running for client intelligence in all the wrong places.

    Instead, get yourself introduced to your partners by a trusted third party. Because statistically, clients are willing to pay up to 25% more in an environment that they trust.

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  • Who’s Afraid of Losing Privacy?

    Privacy is a hot topic again these days.

    Twitter has acknowledged that after iPhone users opt to have the app search their contact list, the company stores names, e-mail addresses and phone numbers on its servers for 18 months.

    Google made Wall Street Journal’s front page on Friday, after journalists finding out that a secret code in it’s ads tricked “Apple’s Safari web-browsing software” into allowing Google to monitor what iPhone users were doing on the internet. The search giant disabled the code after receiving a call from the WSJ.

    And NYTimes.com publishes here an extensive feature on how companies learn your secrets.

    Don’t panic

    Now, before panicking, let’s take five minutes to consider some facts, in order to look at the whole picture… 

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  • Clintelica Is a Lot Like a Turbocharger, Really…

    Jeremy Clarkson once said:

    “A turbo: exhaust gases go into the turbocharger and spin it, witchcraft happens and you go faster.”

    Well, Clintelica is a lot like a turbocharger:

    Your social media, mobile and e-mail contacts go into the Network CRM application, witchcraft happens and you get leads.

    If you want to know the technical details, read more on our Products page.

     

     

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  • 5 (plus 2) Trends That Will Change CRM

    According to Gartner, the CRM global arena is a 10 billion euro industry, with an annual growth rate of more than 25%. In total, it is estimated that more than 1 million companies use a CRM system, which also means there is vast potential for the years to come.

    That’s a big market.

    But how will CRM look like in five years from now? Well, that’s a question for analysts to ask (check out here an interesting piece from Software Advice), and for key players or influencers to answer.

    The trends highlighted by Lauren Carlson with expert advice in the article from Software Advice relate to the following…

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